Brain Circulation

REVIEW ARTICLE
Year
: 2015  |  Volume : 1  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 133--139

Remote ischemic conditioning: A treatment for vascular cognitive impairment


David C Hess1, Mohammad B Khan1, John C Morgan1, Md Nasrul Hoda2 
1 Department of Neurology, Medical College of Georgia, Georgia Regent's University, Augusta, Georgia, USA
2 Department of Medical Laboratory, Imaging and Radiologic Sciences, College of Allied Health Sciences, Georgia Regent's University, Augusta, Georgia, USA

Correspondence Address:
David C Hess
Department of Neurology, Medical College of Georgia, Georgia Regent«SQ»s University, Augusta - 30912, Georgia
USA

There is a strong link between hypoperfusion and white matter (WM) damage in patients with leukoaraiosis and vascular cognitive impairment (VCI). Other than management of vascular risk factors, there is no treatment for WM damage and VCI that delays progression of the disease process to dementia. Observational studies suggest that exercise may prevent or slow down the progression of Alzheimer«SQ»s disease (AD) and VCI. However, getting patients to exercise is challenging, especially with advancing age and disability. Remote ischemic conditioning, an «DQ»exercise equivalent,«DQ» allows exercise to be given with a «DQ»device«DQ» at home for long periods of time. Since remote ischemic conditioning (RIC) increases cerebral blood flow (CBF) in preclinical studies and in humans, RIC may be an ideal therapy to treat VCI and WM disease and perhaps even sporadic AD. By using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) imaging of WM progression, a sample size in the range of about 100 subjects per group could determine if RIC has activity in WM disease and VCI.


How to cite this article:
Hess DC, Khan MB, Morgan JC, Hoda M. Remote ischemic conditioning: A treatment for vascular cognitive impairment.Brain Circ 2015;1:133-139


How to cite this URL:
Hess DC, Khan MB, Morgan JC, Hoda M. Remote ischemic conditioning: A treatment for vascular cognitive impairment. Brain Circ [serial online] 2015 [cited 2022 Aug 15 ];1:133-139
Available from: http://www.braincirculation.org/article.asp?issn=2394-8108;year=2015;volume=1;issue=2;spage=133;epage=139;aulast=Hess;type=0