Brain Circulation

ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year
: 2020  |  Volume : 6  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 200--207

A preliminary exploration of acute intracranial pressure-cerebrospinal fluid production relationships in experimental hydrocephalus


Ahmad H Khasawneh1, Petroj C Alexandra1, Paul A Zajciw1, Carolyn A Harris2 
1 Department of Chemical Engineering, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan, USA
2 Department of Chemical Engineering; Department of Biomedical Engineering; Department of Neurosurgery, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan, USA

Correspondence Address:
Ahmad H Khasawneh
6135 Woodward Ave, Detroit, MI 48202
USA

CONTEXT: By occluding the fourth ventricle simultaneously obtaining telemetric data on intracranial pressure (ICP) and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) production, the authors of this study investigate a variety of physiologic parameters in cases of experimental hydrocephalus. AIMS: The aim of this study is to provide a new context on the disrupted homeostasis in hydrocephalus and guide toward improved treatment based on multiple physiological parameters. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Hydrocephalus was induced in ten 21-day-old Sprague–Dawley rats by blocking the flow of CSF to the fourth ventricle with kaolin. Ten days post induction, when physical signs of ventriculomegaly reached Evan's ratio (ER) of ≥0.46, CSF flow and ICP were measured while manipulating body position (0°, 45°, 90°) and heart rate. RESULTS: In hydrocephalic animals (ER ≥0.46), we found a near-steady average acute ICP (13.638 ± 2.331) compared to age-matched controls (ER <0.30) (13.068 ± 8.781), whose ICP fluctuated with the position. Hydrocephalic and controls exhibited an insignificant degree of parabolic shifts in CSF production when body position was changed from prone to 90° and again when moved back to the prone position, a trend more noteworthy in controls (P = 0.1322 and 0.2772). A Pearson's Correlation found CSF production and ICP to be correlated at baseline 0° posture (P = 0.05) in the control group, but not the hydrocephalic group. Weight appeared to play a role when animals were held at 90°. No significant changes in ICP or CSF flow patterns were observed when the heart rate was increased within either group. CONCLUSIONS: These preliminary findings suggest that our standard assumptions of posture-dependent changes in ICP created using data from physiologic data may be inaccurate in the hydrocephalic patient, and thus describe a need to further explore these relationships.


How to cite this article:
Khasawneh AH, Alexandra PC, Zajciw PA, Harris CA. A preliminary exploration of acute intracranial pressure-cerebrospinal fluid production relationships in experimental hydrocephalus.Brain Circ 2020;6:200-207


How to cite this URL:
Khasawneh AH, Alexandra PC, Zajciw PA, Harris CA. A preliminary exploration of acute intracranial pressure-cerebrospinal fluid production relationships in experimental hydrocephalus. Brain Circ [serial online] 2020 [cited 2022 Jan 27 ];6:200-207
Available from: http://www.braincirculation.org/article.asp?issn=2394-8108;year=2020;volume=6;issue=3;spage=200;epage=207;aulast=Khasawneh;type=0